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Go Green for Your Next Move

For most, packing and moving is a necessity. You have to do it and you will, several times over the course of your life. Whether you have thought about it or not, the moving industry is an industry of waste. Considering the amount of bubble wrap, tap, and boxes purchased, a move only adds to the crisis happening on our planet. Most of the materials are used once and discarded. While some items can be recycled, the nerve-wrecking process of a move often overrides our best intentions and we don’t always follow through. But there are ways to reduce waste in the moving industry, here are some tips on how you can too.


Start Planning Early


Once you know you have to move, figure out what you do and don’t want to take with you. Instead of waiting a few days before and having to throw most of your unwanted items in the trash, start planning early. Drop them off at donation centers, start listing the items you want to sell online, or give them away. Your items will find new homes instead of adding to our landfills.


Consider Reusable


Once you begin the packing process, consider using plastic reusable bins. Take inventory of the ones you have first. This option will also eliminate the need for tape. If you go through or don’t have reusable options, reach out to local supermarkets or stores for boxes. While each place is different, most will be happy to let you take the boxes of their hands.


Go Unconventional


To keep your fragile objects protected, consider skipping the bubble wrap and packing paper all together. Use your soft items instead, like linens, clothes, and towels. These items have to be moved anyway so let them have another purpose as well. If you have to use other packing materials, there are environmentally conscious products available such as biodegradable packing peanuts and recycled packing paper.


Think Green


If you’re looking to get movers, be sure to research eco-minded companies in your area. Some have reusable bin options or are conscious of the packing material they use. As long as you’re willing to do a bit more research, you’ll be surprised how many do take the environment into consideration.

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